Arguably the most iconic artists of the “Pop Art” movement, Andy Warhol was the #2 artist worldwide in auction in 2015, following Pablo Picasso. The popularity of his original works and screen prints such as Marilyn Monroe, Mao and Elizabeth Taylor demonstrate a continuing fascination with the artist, who was a diverse showman and entrepreneur. His bold, edgy graphics continue to resonate with audiences evidenced by the increasing market value of his works. Listed below you will find several of the Master’s artworks that we have available for sale, however we carry many original works including paintings and drawings which are not listed on the website.

Contact us directly for our full inventory of works by Andy Warhol EMAIL: info@robinrile.com

35
34
33
1
2
3
32
31
30
4
5
6
29
28
27
7
8
9
26
25
24
10
11
12
23
22
21
13
14
15
20
19
18
16
17
18
17
16
15
19
20
21
14
13
12
22
23
24
11
10
9
25
26
27
8
7
6
28
29
30
5
4
3
2
1

Born in Pittsburg in 1928,  Andy Warhol (born Andrew Warhola) became one of the most iconic leaders of the American Pop Art movement of the 1960’s.  An artist and film maker, Warhol turned the art world on its ear by repurposing banal commercial print advertisements and turning them into what today would be considered Fine Art.

Born of Slovakian immigrants, Warhol’s story would be what many would term the American Dream. A shameless self-promoter and social-climber, Warhol graduated from Carnegie Institute of Technology where he earned his degree in pictoral design. The artist later moved to New York City where he worked as a commercial illustrator which eschewed into what would become a prolific career in the Arts.

Warhol’s notoriety erupted in 1962 when he exhibited Coca-Cola bottles, wooden replicas of Brillo Soap pad boxes and the image he is most recognized for, Campbell’s soup cans. He began mass-producing them in 1963 though the silkscreen process, one which was well suited for Warhol.  Repeating the images reflected both the artist’s non-involvement with the art as well as the supposed emptiness of American materialism. The works propelled Warhol front and center, making him the face of the American Pop Art phenomenon.

During the 1960’s, Warhol dedicated much of his time into underground film-making in his studio, known as the Factory. He produced many black and white reels of film, some as long as 25 hours and produced several films including The Chelsea Girls, Eat and My Hustler. The young, troubled and beautiful pixie-like socialite Edie Sedgewick was one of his favorite models for film. Fans of the artist shuffled in and out of The Factory as it became a hub for those interested in the bizarre world that Andy Warhol had created.

A well-known fixture in the fashion and art world, Warhol became a celebrity in his own right. He continued producing prints of Hollywood celebrities and garish political statements. Warhol involved himself in advertising illustrations, commercial art projects, celebrity film interviews and Interview Magazine. To date, some of Andy Warhol’s individual works have been sold into the tens of millions, proving the irony of his mass-produced, commerialized art.

The artist died in 1987 and many of his works are gracing walls in his hometown of Pittsburgh, at the multi-level Andy Warhol Museum. Works displayed in the museum show the artist’s vast reach including his early commercial sketches, a room of his video reels, small tvs displaying his interviews with movie stars, display cases of ephemera that he had collected over the years as well as what he is most known for, his marvelous screen prints. In his will, Warhol stated that the entirety of his estate was to be used to create a foundation for advancing the visual arts from which The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts was established.